The Power of Collective Responsibility – Trustee Decisions

I recently heard of an interesting situation with a Chair of a Board of Trustees not understanding the concept of collective responsibility. Surely, I asked myself, everyone who serves as a Trustee knows this basic principle – I therefore set out to conduct some simple research by asking colleagues and was surprised to find how many thought collective responsibility was an optional element of decision making!
The situation I encountered is an interesting example of this. It arose when the Chair apparently wished to take a certain course of action but the Board executive committee wished a different course. Having failed to reach consensus it was agreed the two opposing views would be presented to the full board for a decision. The Chair believed if his course was not followed there would be many serious repercussions – a form of ‘project fear’ began! Shortly before the board meeting the Chair, when circulating the agenda and the two opposing papers, declared that the minutes of the meeting would list all the Trustees and how they voted on the issue. Some Trustees viewed this as intimidation. When challenged during the meeting to justify the decision to record names the Chair stated it was an opportunity for at a later stage (assuming he lost the vote and all his fears came true of problems) those who lost the vote (himself included) to respond to external criticism by saying it was not their fault because they voted against it.
The Chair was challenged by some Trustees over collective responsibility – he indicated he understood the principle, but claimed it did not apply if one states in the minutes you did not support the relevant decision. Extraordinary.
The power of the concept of collective responsibility should not be, in my view, under estimated. It helps brings a board together, it encourages open and free debate, it ensures decisions made (especially the very difficult ones) are robust and can stand up to scrutiny.
For those of you unfamiliar with the guidelines for collective decisions I have set out the basic principles below:
  • It is a legal requirement that all Trustees have a duty to make decisions ‘collectively’ (jointly). It does not usually mean that the Trustees must all agree, or that a decision can only be made if every Trustee takes part.
  • Once a decision has been made, all Trustees must support, abide by,  and carry out that decision.
  • An absent Trustee will still share responsibility for the decision that the other Trustees made.
  • If a Trustee strongly disagrees with a decision, they can ask for their disagreement to be recorded in the minutes. Even if a Trustee asks for their disagreement with a decision to be recorded, they will still, under the principle of collective responsibility, be held jointly responsible.
  • A Trustee might feel so strongly that a decision is not in the interests of the charity that they have no choice but to resign.
Sources: Charity Commission For England and Wales: Guidance ‘It’s your decision: charity trustees and decision making (CC27)

My first pair of tassel loafers

There are time in our lives when we have take the leap, the plunge into the unknown, to be bold (or as Sir Humphrey Appleby would say in ‘Yes Minister’ to be courageous). This week for me, at the age of 56, I purchased (and wore in public) a pair of shoes with tassels on them. I accept this is perhaps not such a big issue for many readers with a General Election only a few weeks away, but for a middle aged man known for his love of the 1920s and 1930s its as big as it can get!
I cannot even explain, in any rational sense, why tassels have been such a problem for me. I’m sure at some point in my orderly, conservative and structured past (most likely at RAF College Cranwell during officer training – that haven of early adult life sartorial correctness) I had been informed such shoes ‘too casual’, ‘American’ or even flippant for a gentleman.
And why now? Why at this point in middle life have I decided to become ‘courageous’?
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There is in fact no science to it at all! It happened by chance as I began planning for a forthcoming trip to Lisbon. I am due to speak at the end of May at the Horasis Global Leaders’ Summit in Cascais Portugal and then spend a few days relaxing and exploring Lisbon. As my packing list (using one of my favourite apps TripList) grew I began to look at my shoe collection and realised as I had not spent anytime in Mediterranean countries in the summer months since the mid 1990s I had no suitable ‘smart’ casual shoes. G. Bruce Boyer once wrote a loafer has “the comfort of the moccasin while adding the fashion and elegance of a dressy shoe” – I therefore began to look for loafers to fill this sartorial gap. It was during my initial search I spotted, on the various online forums I regularly follow, a consistent level of support of tasseled loafers, especially in a mid-tan tone.
Not knowing whether I would ultimate develop a long term fondness for them I decided to make a purchase in what I would describe as the mid-price point (not the Office version for £45 nor the Loake version for £240). I eventually found a pair at Charles Tyrwhitt. They have a Blake welt, where the upper is wrapped around the insole and attached between it and the outsole. A single stitch attaches everything together.
Because it is a simpler construction than a goodyear welt, it is also less expensive. It is a process that allows for resoling once the outsole is worn. Apparently Blake welting is also superior when seeking a close-cut sole and, because there are no exterior stitches, the body of the outsole can be cut very close to the upper. Lastly, because it has fewer layers than a Goodyear welt, a Blake-welted sole is more flexible – ideal for a loafer.

I ordered them online and they were delivered within 5 days. I can honestly state that when I opened the box the sight of them (and the beautiful leather aroma) took my breath away (and that does not often happen!). They are wide enough to be a comfortable fit, yet retain a slim and elongated look. I am delighted with them. They even came with individual soft shoe bags.

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I treated them with my Mink Oil Renovator (from Justin at the Shoe Snob Blog) and have recently worn them for the first time for a somewhat casual working Friday in London. Rarely is it possible for me to wear new shoes for a day without some form of discomfort, but not with these – they have been superb.
And what about the tassels? They certainly add a sense of rakishness to the shoes and to my overall look – added to the glorious tan colour they are a much welcome addition to my wardrobe, both in my capacity as a CEO and more casually. There is, even in my CEO role, an opportunity here for these shoes to be both smart (perhaps with my blue blazer) and casual (with chinos and a lightweight linen jacket). They certainly will see more UK time and not just be saved for trips to the Mediterranean! I would recommend them to anyone looking for multi-functional smart yet casual shoe.